virtual tour example

home gallery product info downloads buy now support learn more search

learn more

Multi-row stitching with The Panorama Factory V4

John Strait
January, 2006


Introduction

For many years, users have wished for a multi-row capability in The Panorama Factory.  In the past, there have been attempts to perform multi-row stitching with a manual, multi-step procedure.  These attempts have rarely produced acceptable results, primarily because The Panorama Factory V1, V2 and V3 did not provide for camera rotation and tilt.

The Panorama Factory V4 introduces new stitching methods that accurately stitch images made with rotated and tilted cameras.  It is now possible, using these new stitching methods, to produce excellent multi-row panoramas with a manual, multi-step procedure.

This series of web pages explains multi-row stitching with The Panorama Factory V4 in a step-by-step format.  We have identified several different approaches to multi-row stitching, depending upon the photographic technique used.  We're not promising that these are easy procedures to follow.  In fact, it can be somewhat tedious.  However, the results are worth it!

top


Techniques

We have identified several different approaches to multi-row stitching, depending upon the photographic technique used.  Each of the approaches will be presented in its own step-by-step procedure.

These approaches do not cover all possible multi-row stitching situations, so it's important to read and select the approach before you take your pictures.

  1. Full sphere panoramas with a tripod can be made with semi-automatic stitching.  For best results, we recommend that you use a panoramic tripod head.  This method can produce full sphere panoramas such as:

  2. Partial panoramas with a tripod can also be made with semi-automatic stitching.  The procedure is similar to the previous one, but it requires a little extra work because we can't take advantage of the fact that 360 degree rows are linked into a ring.  This method is especially applicable to multi-row pictures of buildings.  See, for example:

  3. Partial hand held panoramas can be made with manual stitching, providing there are vertical lines visible in each row of the panorama.  This method is especially applicable to multi-row pictures of buildings.  See, for example,

  4. Partial hand held panoramas without vertical elements can be made with manual stitching, providing the horizon line is visible in each row of the panorama.  The method is limited to two-row panoramas because the horizon cannot be visible in more than two rows at once.


 Step-by-step instructions

Each multi-row stitching method is presented in its own web:

It's possible to combine elements of these techniques to do other types of stitching.  For example, full sphere hand held panoramas are possible, although it may takes a lot more manual work and the result isn't likely to be as accurately stitched.  Here's an example of a hand held panorama:

Pilot House of the Charles E towboat at the Science Museum of Minnesota

This type of complex stitching, while possible, is beyond the scope of this tutorial

top


Revised: March 19, 2007

 1999-2006 Smoky City Design, LLC and John Strait